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Friday, 25 July 2008

Greetings from Wilderness Island Resort Ontario Canada This was a really gorgeous week. Sunny days, mid to high 70's for temperature and just creeping into the low 80's one day. Some really great fishing too. Here is a picture of the 37 in Northern Pike Scott Blackall caught and released, and the 26 inch Walleye Don Sutto caught and released.
Have a Good Day! Al Errington Errington's Wilderness Island Resort www.WildernessIsland.com

Saturday, 19 July 2008

Thermacell Bug Repellent

Greetings from Wilderness Island Resort Ontario Canada
Thermacell is a new type of bug repellent that keeps bugs out of a small area. I had seen them for sale but had not really researched them until there was an article in an Astronomy magazine. Astronomers and amateur star gazers usually don't like to use bug repellent lotions because they can damage their telescopes during handling. So a bug repellent that you just turn on and it just sit there keeping bugs away is very appealing to them. They tested a number of bug repellent devices and highly recommended the Thermacell.
I decided to get a couple Thermacells and try them, they work very well. I had a very good opportunity the last couple of days to give them a really good test. We have been doing a renovation on cabin #2 including a bunch of plumbing work under the cabin, a perfect mosquito haven. I was under the cabin for about 15 minutes swatting mosquitos when I remembered the Thermacells. I went and got one, turned it on, put under the cabin and in about 15 minutes the mosquitos were gone. It was almost enjoyable underneath the cabin.
The Thermacells work by warming a small fibre pad with repellent on it. One patch last about 4 hours and give you about a 15 foot diameter area with virtually no bugs. Because the repellent is airborn Thermacells are not affective in a wind or, unfortunately, if you are hiking or moving around. They are great however if you are sitting on a deck or out in a boat on a still evening. You can get Thermacells in most outdoor stores, Amazon sells them online, and we have them for sale here now too.

Happy Bug Free Vacations
Al Errington

Friday, 18 July 2008

Interpretive Trail

Greetings from Wilderness Island Resort Ontario Canada

Hello this is Bobbi again, last time I wrote I didn't have time to talk about the interpretive trail that I did at the resort last year.

So, here goes...

When they eventually get put up, there are going to be interpretive signs on the main island and around the trails by the cabins. These interpretive signs tell what tree species we have on the lake, and useful tidbits about the individual tree. These can become very informative to people and gets people to know what the 'Boreal Forest' is like and the main tree species that we have on the lake. Useful tips such as identifying them, with leaves, bark and their silouette from afar.


The main species we have on the lake is Black Spruce, be we also have White Spruce, Jack Pine, White Birch, Trembling Aspen., just to name a few. A lot of people see these trees everyday and don't take the time to get to know them. So these interpretive signs will help and aid people and give them some knowledge of what tree species we have. So, I'm hoping people will learn a thing or two.

I hope these help tourists like yourself, and eventually when Abby and Doris have time, I mentioned if they could go on Timberwolf Island and get some 'tree cookies' ( a cross section of the tree) and send them to me and I can analyze them here in the lab, with the Dendrochronometer. This can tell me, signs of insect damage, thinning, fire, frost rings and the age of the tree. I hoping I can get a Black Spruce, White Spruce, Trembling Aspen, White Birch and Jack Pine. Basically, I just want to see what the tree growth is in that region. So, I'll keep you posted, and go out and enjoy those interpretive trails.

Bobbi
Forest Researcher
Canadian Wood Fibre Centre

Sault Ste. Marie

Monday, 14 July 2008

New dog Nikita

Greetings from Wilderness Island Resort Ontario Canada
Hi, my name is Morgan Errington (Al and Doris's daughter). I have a great time up here; swimming, fishing, and watching the beauty of wildlife. I even like how my dogs interact with the wildlife. Especially our new puppy, Nikita, she is a German Shepherd/husky mix. We adopted her from the pound 5 months after sadly, we had to put Tasha down(our 17 year old German Shepherd mix). Sable, our Siberian Husky seamed very gloomy the first couple of months, after seeing him like that, we decided that we needed to get him a little play mate. So we kept a eye on the pound and were watching if any puppies would show up, that were very young. There were a couple of nice puppies there, but just really didn't fit in so well. Then a litter of about 10 pups came in, they were so adorable and were only 6 weeks old. So on the way into Sault Saint Marie, we stopped off at the Humane Society and were just melted by those little puppy faces. But their were three that we wanted the most, a big fluffy black and white fat one, one that looked like Nikita(shepherd looking), but was the runt, and Nikita. I picked up all the dogs and scratched out the runt because Nikita was really cute. Then as I held Nikita and my mom help the black and white one and as Nikita's little face was buried in my shoulder and the black and white one just laying there, then as Nikita started licking my face, I knew Nikita was the one. When we took her home to Sable, we didn't let them interact for the first day, just so that Nikita could get some rest. That night, I was in tears because Nikita was throwing up worms and blood everywhere and I thought she was going to die. It turned out that Nikita was passed on round worms through her mother as all her other litter mates got them to, so we went to the vet's office and got her some pills. I was releaved that she didn't have some type of disease that would kill her. So the next day we let Nikita and Sable interact a little bit and they were doing ok that day, and for a couple more days until Nikita got this thing where she wanted to bite ALL OF THE TIME, she would just keep on annoying Sable, it was funny how Sable reacted, but he would never ever try to kill her, but sometimes they rough play a little to much right now, but no dog gets hurt.

Nikita is now a healthy, nice and a very cute dog, she likes to tug and annoy sometimes, but she is a joy to have in the family.

Sunday, 13 July 2008

Trophy Pike Fly Fishing

Here is the 38 inch Northern Pike that Darryl Young caught and released June 30.Fly fishing fly for Northern Pike Darryl caught this Pike on a 9 inch Pike Fly. This is a beautiful Pike and I think the largest I remember being caught on a fly rod on our Lake.
Congratulations and Thank You Darryl.

Al & Doris Errington

Saturday, 5 July 2008

Trophy Walleye by Tom Holden

Canadian
Tom Holden with Trophy Walleye

Our Walleye Catch & Release contest got serious today when Tom Holden caught this beautiful 31-1/2" Walleye. From what we heard there was a lot of cheering for a few minutes as he and his brother Dan were landing and measuring her. They took a quick picture and returned her to the lake to continue contributing to quality fishing in Lake Wabatongushi.
This is a really beautiful Walleye that is probably about 30 years old and basically there is no chance that she is anything but a very large healthy female at the peak of her reproductive abilities. She has laid millions of eggs over the years and given her size and health, will probably lay close to a half million eggs next spring and hopefully for a number of years into the future. Congratulations Tom and thank you for releasing such a great fish so she can continue to contribute to Lake Wabatongushi's great fishing. You can click on Tom's picture to see a larger picture. For more information on size and age of Walleye and Northern Pike in our lake and area of Ontario Canada please go to our website at www.WildernessIsland.com/fishing/fish_age-size.html.

Have a Good Day!
Al & Doris Errington

Wednesday, 2 July 2008

Trophy Pike Fly Fishing

The largest Northern Pike caught and release this year is now up to 38 inches and it was caught fly fishing. Daryl Young is a very avid fly fisherman and his favorite is fly fishing for Northern Pike. He ties his own flies. Fly fishing fly for Northern PikeThe fly he used to catch the 38 inch Northern Pike is about 9 inches long, dark with red highlights and a diving head.

We will post a picture of Daryl's Northern Pike as soon as he sends it to us.

A 38 inch Northern Pike is about 18 years old in our area and it is a 92% chance that it is a large female in her prime as a spawner. Thank you Daryl for releasing her so she can continue to contribute to high quality Northern Pike fishing in Lake Wabatongushi.

Have a Good Day!
Al & Doris Errington

Tuesday, 1 July 2008

Canada Border - Passports

US citizens entering Canada. It is still pretty straightforward going into Canada through the land border crossings, however going back to the United States is becoming increasingly complicated. This year you still do not need a passport to go back to the US by land. You can still use a drivers license for identification and either a birth certificate of landed immigrant certificate if you need to show citizenship.

US Homeland Security's plan is to implement the passport requirement to enter the United States by land next June. If you do have a passport and are planning a trip to Canada, please use it. The customs and immigration people on both sides like passports and there is a definite tendency to allow people with passports to go through the border very quickly.

Some States and Provinces are beginning to issue enhanced drivers licenses that are secure documents that provide both identification and citizenship information. These should be just as useful and acceptable for Border officials as passports, and a lot more convenient to carry than passports since the huge downside of passports is they do not fit into a wallet.

You do need a passport to fly into Canada or the US. US citizens can still travel by land to Canada this year without a passport, but if you are planning a vacation to Canada after June of next year, you should start your US passport application now.

If you are going back to the United States by land next year, although adults will need a passport, children under 16 will not need a passport. Children not traveling with their parents will still require documentation and letters of permission. This requirement has been imposed at the Canada-US border for a very long time since both Canadian and US Border officials are a major force in the effort to find and help missing and exploited children.

The one significant complication in traveling to Canada over the past number of years are DUI's (Driving under the Influence). Over 10 years ago Drinking and Driving was changed to a serious federal offence in Canada. At first everyone with DUI's was being stopped at the border along with other people with minor and major criminal records. Over the last number of years it has become a lot more practical.

Under certain circumstances, persons with criminal records can enter Canada.
  • Deemed Rehabilitation - For all but the most serious offences, a person with a single conviction, who has completed their sentence more than 10 years ago, is deemed rehabilitated. There is no formal process for deemed rehabilitation, you simply go to the border, disclose your previous conviction, and the Canadian border official has the discretionary authority to admit you based on deemed rehabilitation.
  • Granted Rehabilitation - This is for people with more serious offences, more than one offence, or offences less than 10 years old. Canada has a formal process for granted rehabilitation where certain criteria is met. Generally 5 years must have passed from the completion of the most recent sentence, and evidence of rehabilitation may be required such as court documents, probation reports, and letters of reference. A personal interview may also be required. There is a fee, which is usually $200 but fees may be $1000 or more for very serious or complicated cases. The usual procedure to apply for granted rehabilitation is to apply through the nearest Canadian Consulate in your home country. This process can be lengthy and waits of 12 to 18 months for a determination are common in the more complicated cases. Granted Rehabilitation will remain in place for crossing the border into Canada as long as no new offences are incurred. New offences invalidate you Granted rehabilitation and the process must be started all over again.
  • Temporary Residence Permit - If you come to the border and have a DUI or other minor criminal convictions that are less than 10 years old, the Canadian Border officials can issue a temporary residence permit if they feel you would probably qualify for the Granted Rehabilitation above. This permit costs $200 and can be used to cross into Canada only once on the day it is issued. If you are issued a Temporary Residence Permit, you should apply for Granted Rehabilitation when you return home.
You should not try to deceive or mislead Canadian and US Border officials since they have access to most criminal records for almost every country in the world because of international cooperation among law enforcement agencies. If you have your documents in order and honestly provide the information the US and Canadian border officials request you should pass through the border in a couple of minutes. Although passports are not required to cross the US-Canada Border, if you have your passport with you it makes crossing the border very fast and pleasant because passports makes the border officials job very easy.

NOTO, Nature & Outdoor Tourism Ontario, the outdoor tourism organization for Ontario Canada, has been working with the Canadian and US Government as well as other organizations on Border issues. NOTO has a very informative bulletin board on Border Issues on their website at www.noto.net/bulletins/thread.cfm?threadid=4039. You can also email questions to the NOTO office at info@NOTO.net or phone Doug, Todd or Laurie at 705-472-5552.